Integration of Tourism and Transport Information Services for Urban Tourists



Integration of Tourism and Transport Information Services for Urban Tourists

Authors

Melinda Jaszberenyi, Corvinus University of Budapest, Andras Munkacsy, KTI Institute for Transport Sciences NLtd.

Description

On the basis of a case study, including a questionnaire to 500 international tourists in Budapest, the paper aims to explore the problem of how to provide tourists with information on urban transport efficiently.

Abstract

Tourists represent a growing pressure on urban mobility but (as per Albalete and Bel, 2009) this pressure does not seem to be addressed by cities. A local resident takes regular trips on a daily basis and have a view about mobility options on this route, especially the fastest or the direct one, and at least some information about the core network and how to get informed about other itineraries. In this term, the trips of a tourist are all irregular. And although they need special information on urban mobility options, these information services are traditionally planned for local people (residents, commuters, etc.) and their regular trips.

On the one hand, tourists do not have knowledge about obvious and inherent properties of the transport system, such as urban structure, service hours or symbols. They do not get informed about service alterations, such as major road works and long or short term service disruptions. In times of short stays, when most of the trips take not more than three nights in the European Union, tourists need fast and concise information, on the other.

This paper aims to explore the problem of how to provide tourists with information on urban transport efficiently, i.e. taking into account that they use the transport system to reach a number of destinations (tourist attractions, airport, etc.) and in many cases they do not need the fastest or direct route but the most attractive or a thematic one. That is why a case study in Budapest, a top destination in Europe, has been carried out to analyze the information that visitors really need when travelling in a city and to reveal their attitudes towards current information services. The study is based on a survey of 500 international tourists.

On the basis of the case study, a set of basic information has been defined for target groups (by age, by trip purpose) and guidelines for cities and urban transport service providers have been drafted for the improvement of tourist information services. The guidelines pave the way not only for an improvement but also for new products (including traditional information materials and technology based applications) to integrate information services for tourists on tourism and transport according to their needs.

Publisher

Association for European Transport