Analysis of the First Three Waves of the Netherlands Mobility Panel (MPN): Changes in Individual Travel Behaviour



Analysis of the First Three Waves of the Netherlands Mobility Panel (MPN): Changes in Individual Travel Behaviour

Authors

Paul Van Beek, Goudappel Coffeng, Sascha Hoogendoorn-Lanser, KiM Netherlands Institute for Transport Policy Analysis, Marie-Jose Olde Kalter, University of Twente

Description

The Netherlands Mobility Panel (MPN) is a longitudinal household panel that has been set-up in order to study the short-run and long-run dynamics in travel behaviour of Dutch individuals and their households. First results are presented.

Abstract

The Netherlands Mobility Panel (in Dutch: Mobiliteitspanel Nederland, MPN) is a longitudinal household panel that has been set-up in order to study the short-run and long-run dynamics in travel behaviour of Dutch individuals and households, and to determine how changes in personal and household characteristics and in other travel-related factors correlate with changes in travel behaviour.

By now, data has been collected in autumn 2013, 2014 and 2015. The sample was drawn from an existing Dutch access panel in such a way that the net response closely resembles the Dutch population with respect to age, gender, household composition, education, main occupation, level of urbanisation of residential area and number of cars in the household. Randomly ± 6000 households were asked to fill out a household survey. All household members 12 years or older also filled out a personal questionnaire and a three-day travel diary. Panel statistics are (each wave, approx): 2.000 households, 4.000 travel diaries, 12.000 travel days and 6.000 personal questionnaires.
For the travel diary, three successive week days were randomly selected. The number of weekdays is chosen as the optimal trade-off between panel fatigue and desired information. All travel diaries in one household are filled in on the same days, allowing the analysis of household interaction.

Travel diaries are to be filled out with help of an easy accessible activity scheme which smoothly takes the respondent through the three panel days. Journey and separate trip information is collected. Typical data about travel purpose, begin- and end time of the trip, origin and destination and travel modes are collected. The three-day travel diary is more detailed compared with the Dutch National Travel Survey. For example, there are additional questions about trip delay and parking costs.

The personal questionnaire contains several travel related questions, for example about preferences towards travel modes. Also, each year a special topic is selected by the research team. This topic is repeated every two years. Two topics are chosen for the first 4 waves of the MPN: ICT and mobility, and attitudes and preferences towards travel modes.

In this paper we will show the first longitudinal analyses on three years of travel data from the MPN. The results will be compared with figures from the (repeated cross-sectional) National Travel Survey (OViN) that is continuously conducted by Statistics Netherlands (CBS). Special attention is given to individual changes in travel behavior. On average, first results show a slight decrease, or stability, in the number of trips per person per day. The so called stayers, those who responded each year, show a slight decrease in the number of trips per day (from 3,2 to 3,0) and at the same time changes within the slow modes: more cycling and less walking.

At the same time we see high dynamics in travel behavior on an individual level: many respondents show changes in for example mode choice and the number of trips per day.

In performing the analyses, the authors paid special attention to typical panel topics as non-response, attrition and panel conditioning. The majority of the the analyses that will be presented in the paper has already been carried out by the authors. Additionally in spring, in-depth face-to-face interviews will be conducted with part of the respondents to gain more insights into changes in travel behaviour.

Publisher

Association for European Transport