Pedestrian Modelling for Persons with Restricted Mobility at Transport Interchanges



Pedestrian Modelling for Persons with Restricted Mobility at Transport Interchanges

Authors

Paul Clifford, Mott MacDonald, Elizabeth Melville, Mott MacDonald, Sonja Nightingale, Mott MacDonald

Description

Simulation modelling of passengers and pedestrians within interchanges has become commonplace. This paper outlines how such models can assess how interchange design may impact on those with reduced mobility.

Abstract

The use of simulation modelling of passengers and pedestrians within stations and buildings has become commonplace and the application of capacity and safety evaluations is required by many rail and mass transit operators. As simulation software packages have developed, so has their application. In reviewing many major infrastructure projects, operators and designers are now increasingly looking to address the needs of passengers and pedestrians with mobility restrictions.
Particular issues that have arisen include the accessibility for different users within an interchange and within a locality. Additionally, whilst interest groups and users will have a very positive contribution to make, decision makers often need to ensure that there is value for money or a priority order for work. Developing a consistent accessibility and access review approach for major transport investments that sits alongside simulation assessment models will enhance this process.
To assist with this requirement Mott MacDonald previously included gradient impact within their in-house pedestrian simulation model (STEPS), but has now taken this further with the inclusion of more person types within the simulation. Additionally, with the newer detailed platform train interface simulation program (ALIGHT) the wider issues of train door, vestibule and seating arrangements are considered.
This paper introduces the concepts involved, the range of transport users to consider, the software approach, the collaboration with academic institutions and the different results obtained through using the new approach. It outlines the developments within the STEPS and ALIGHT simulation programs that offer the user the potential to assess how interchange design may impact on passengers and pedestrians with reduced mobility. Also, it sets out how this more detailed simulation approach will benefit train, tram and other public transport investment decisions for greater accessibility for all travellers.

Publisher

Association for European Transport