European Union Enlargement Issues in Transport



European Union Enlargement Issues in Transport

Authors

SCHEELE J, European Commission, Belgium

Description

Following the conclusion of the European Union Intergovemmental Conference in Amsterdam on 17 June, the European Commission, on 16 July, tabled a series of documents, known as Agenda 2000, an d numbering about 1 200 pages. Apart from the Commission's form

Abstract

Following the conclusion of the European Union Intergovemmental Conference in Amsterdam on 17 June, the European Commission, on 16 July, tabled a series of documents, known as Agenda 2000, an d numbering about 1 200 pages. Apart from the Commission's formal Opinion on the candidacies of each often Central European countries for accession to the Union, Agenda 2000 looks at the need for adaptation of Community policies in the context of the ongoing process of globalisation and restructuring of markets. Above all it defines the Commission's approach to the general issue of the development of the Union after the year 2000, and how it should tackle the prospect of negotiations with eleven countries - the ten Central European candidates and Cyprus - the relationship with Turkey, another candidate, and how certain major Community policies, and the Community Budget, should be developed to meet the challenge. This "composite paper" consists of two volumes. The first, entitled "For a Stronger and Wider Union'', looks at the needs of the Union in the 2000's, and how its internal policies should develop, how enlargement should be tackled, and how it should all be financed. The second volume, "The Challenge 6f Enlargement", looks at the policies to be developed specifically to deal with the needs of the candidate countries, and also the impact of enlargement on the development of Community policies.

Obviously, Agenda 2000 is not the last word which will be said on the various issues it covers. The various documents will be examined by the Council of the European Union and the European Parliament over the next few months, and the European Council, when it meets in December 1977, will take a series of decisions so that accession negotiations can be opened early in 1998.

This paper attempts to examine the implications for the transport sector of the proposed enlargement for both the candidate countries and the Union as a whole It does not therefore attempt to summarise every aspect of Agenda 2000, since this would be neither desirable nor feasible in the context of the European Transport Foruna.

Publisher

Association for European Transport