Container Terminals Hinterland Transport in Cities



Container Terminals Hinterland Transport in Cities

Authors

Jens Froese, Technical University Hamburg, Svenja Toeter, Ministry of Energy, Agriculture, the Environment and Rural Areas

Description

The paper aims at searching for solutions to mitigate emissions and to allow in future the coexistence of cities and ports under liveable conditions

Abstract

Container Terminals Hinterland Transport in Cities
Prof. Jens Froese, Technical University Hamburg, Dr. Svenja Toeter, Erasmus University Rotter-dam

Most European container terminals are situated close to a city or even embraced by residential areas. Feeding the terminals with export containers and distributing import containers gener-ates heavy goods vehicle traffic currently increasingly being scrutinised by environmental groups followed by residents and finally politics reacting on public pressure. Claims address emissions such as CO2, NOx and the lethal risk of particulate matter but also traffic jams and noise.
Even when the terminal situation allows for further growth, port and city road traffic may not and is becoming a prominent restrictive factor, hence limiting the vital role of ports as transport nodes.

The increase in ship size exacerbates the situation as traffic peaks associated to ship calls also increase. After recovery of the currently weak world trade, especially in the relation between Europe and Asia, it is expected that the ultra-large container vessels with a capacity of about 20.000 TEU (twenty feet equivalent unit) will generate up to 10.000 moves (crane moves or im-port plus export boxes) per port call. Depending on the modal split for collecting and distrib-uting the boxes, hub ports then must expect between 3.000 and 6.000 truck moves per big ship call.

The paper aims at searching for solutions to mitigate emissions and to allow in future the coex-istence of cities and ports under liveable conditions by combing technical innovations and or-ganisational measures taking into account promising business models to maintain attractiveness of required transport services for private entrepreneurs. The potential role of public entities from port authorities to bodies funding research and subsidizing innovative infrastructure will also be considered.

Innovative ideas and testbed plans and experiences from other parts of the world as e.g. the e-highway testbed in Los Angeles will be investigated upon their transferability to Europe.

Publisher

Association for European Transport