A New Metro Line for Budapest: a Comparison with London and Paris



A New Metro Line for Budapest: a Comparison with London and Paris

Authors

RAHMATABADI K, Symonds Travers Morgan, UK 171 CORNET N, RATP, France and PERJES T, Duna-Bit Consultancy, Hungary

Description

Major Capital cities of the world are increasingly engaged in competition to attract larger shares of the global commercial and industrial activities as well as accommodating an increas]fig existing travel demand. From a regional viewpoint, the competitio

Abstract

Major Capital cities of the world are increasingly engaged in competition to attract larger shares of the global commercial and industrial activities as well as accommodating an increas]fig existing travel demand. From a regional viewpoint, the competition to attract industry and commerce is extremely intense amongst the emerging markets of eastern and central Europe.

With urban highway congestion at saturation levels in all major competing cities, together with considerations for environmental issues and the lack of physical space for further road building, city authorities are increasingly appreciating the benefits of maas and intermediate transit systems and the role that these systems can play in efficiently supplying the demand for travel within urban areas. Over the past decade in all major European cities the realisation of this important fact has resulted in extensive activities in appraisal of new systems and improvement of existing systems - although implementation has been continuously lagging behind the need due to budgetary constraints.

In some cases, schemes are primarily initiated as the utilisation ofpubtie transport services has already been stretched to capacity and demand for travel by public transport is already high. I-Iere the problem is more visible in terms of existing demand outweighing the supply. In other eases, schemes are considered based on city's aspirations to develop particular corridors and for regeneration purposes. However, by and large all proposals claim to fulfil both roles to some degree. Whatever the primary strategic motive, it is significant that the answer to problems of accessibility is no longer seen to be provision for the inefficient private car traffie.

Following Hungary's entry to the market economy and increasing commercial activity in Budapest, sharp increases in car ownership resulted in a significant increase in urban congestion spread throughout the urban area. The first reaction of city authorities was to further accommodate the private ear by providing more road space. A policy which closely resembles policies of western European cities for over 20 years prior to mid-1980's. However, soon the restrictive costs and physical difficulties of further road space provision in conventionally dense city scape of Budapest, resulted in city authorities resorting to traffic and parking management measures to maximise the use of available road space for private car traffic, at times at the expense of worsening conditions for public transport vehicles which shared the road space with private ears.

Publisher

Association for European Transport