What Went Wrong and What Can We Learn from It?



What Went Wrong and What Can We Learn from It?

Authors

POELSTRA H, City of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Description

Periodic evaluation is an indispensable tool for good policy-making. This is particularly true for traffic and transport where so many unpredictable situations can occur that intermittent appraisals are necessary to stay on course.

Abstract

Periodic evaluation is an indispensable tool for good policy-making. This is particularly true for traffic and transport where so many unpredictable situations can occur that intermittent appraisals are necessary to stay on course.

Being aware of this fact, the City of Amsterdam decided to evaluate its existing traffic and transport policy last year. This existing policy is based on the Regional Traffic and Transport Plan (KTTP) for 2005 which had been accepted by the regional council and its municipalities in 1993. Since the plan had been based on information dating back to 1991, it was possible to evaluate the f~rst five years of the plan and allow this evaluation to serve as a midterm review for Amsterdam's city council.

A report on this policy evaluation was published in May 1996. It described traffic and transport developments taking place in Amsterdam between 1991 and 1996; these developments were then compared to the policy lines established in the RTTP. The comparisons questioned the effectiveness of existing policy and its various instruments as well as measuring the proximity of targets set for 2005. These answers and conclusions were used to formulate policy recommendations.

When describing developments, both travel behaviour and policy instruments were examlued: the latter being the infrastructure and supportive measures intended to influence travel behaviour. The only source of information was existing data (annual counts and surveys, and estimates); no specific research was carried out.

Although this involved a comparison with the RTTP, and thus with a larger area, the focus was on the situation in Amsterdam itself. For Amsterdam, developments are often subdivided into three areas, each with its own character in the sphere of traffic and transport: the inner city, the 19th century belt, and the post-war extensions (see figure 1).

Publisher

Association for European Transport