Mixed Use Development and Car Dependency



Mixed Use Development and Car Dependency

Authors

ANABLE J, Oxford Brookes University, UK

Description

Recent policy focusing on mixed development at all levels of government is being assembled hastily without full understanding of the relationships involved. There is growing danger that policies could be formulated so as at best to fail to maximise their

Abstract

Recent policy focusing on mixed development at all levels of government is being assembled hastily without full understanding of the relationships involved. There is growing danger that policies could be formulated so as at best to fail to maximise their potential_ benefits, and at worse to overlook any disadvantages resulting from ill informed and misdirected objectives. This research., based entirely on an MSc dissertation to be submitted at Oxford Brookes University, School of Planning in May 1997, will explore the hypotheses that mixed use development reduces car dependency. In this paper, findings from empirical analysis to test the relationships between resident travel behaviour and land use mix at the disaggregated, neighbourhood level will be presented. Data generated from household surveys in 'purpose built' and established mixed use locations in Oxfordshire are used to analyse the relative influence on modal choice and trip rates attributable to land uses, local and strategic accessibility and scale of development.

In addition, the ways in which local planning departments are responding to renewed interest and government guidance on mixed use is investigated through a local plan search and interviews with authority representatives. This research also draws upon a period of research in Berlin, Germany, where investigation into the policy process revealed detailed prescription of mixed use policies and greater clarity of objectives. The results will be brought together to assess how far the travel implications of mixed use development are considered in policy formulation in the UK and to define 'successful' principles to best achieve sustainable transport objectives. The findings will go some way towards contributing to this vital stage in the development of policies aimed at reducing the need to travel.

Publisher

Association for European Transport