New Urbanism: the Movement System and Mixed-use Town



New Urbanism: the Movement System and Mixed-use Town

Authors

GIBSON G L, Community Design Service, UK

Description

This paper concentrates on aspects of New Urbanism that impact on movement systems - for pedestrians, cyclists, motor vehicles and public transport. 'Access', a concept that has much in common with the transportation profession, is central to urban design

Abstract

This paper concentrates on aspects of New Urbanism that impact on movement systems - for pedestrians, cyclists, motor vehicles and public transport. 'Access', a concept that has much in common with the transportation profession, is central to urban design. In constructing urban form that provides safe, affordal?le access to the daily needs of life for the users of urban space, New Urbanism strives for integrated settlements that, by their built form, provide a sustainable vitality of urban living. This has proved elusive, and costly, in much of twentieth century planning and the paper analyses the eortfiguration of established settlements to inform a definition of "good mixed-use town".

"New Urbanism", in the words of its most organised current, stands for,

"the restoration of existing urban centres cmd towns within, coherent metropolitan regions, the reconfiguration of sprawling sub#rbs into communities of real neighborhoods and diverse districts, the conservation of natural environments, and the preservation of our built legacy"

(from the Charter of the New UrbanismJ).

I cannot, and do not, pretend to speak on behalf of New Urbanism. It is not a unitary phenomenon. The discipline of Urban Design, as we practice it, draws heavily on, and contributes to what may appear to be new theories of urban form. We learn virtually everything we need to know from millennia of settlements and, especially, from the rapid growth of urban living since the industrial revolution.

Publisher

Association for European Transport