State-of-the-Art Analysis: Continuous Pre-Planning of Required Transportation Capacity for the Design of Sustainable Freight Transportation Networks



State-of-the-Art Analysis: Continuous Pre-Planning of Required Transportation Capacity for the Design of Sustainable Freight Transportation Networks

Nominated for The Neil Mansfield Award

Authors

Georg Brunnthaller, Fraunhofer Austria, Sandra Stein, Fraunhofer Austria, Wilfried Sihn, Fraunhofer Austria

Description

Increasing volatility in transportation demand leads to reduced capacity utilisation. The paper gives a structured review on modal choice and capacity management problems. Relevant references are discussed and future research demand is pointed out.

Abstract

Increasing volatility in transportation demand challenges logistics service providers and carriers to continuously utilise their transportation resources to a high extent. Short-term planning horizons and planning uncertainties lead to unfavourable modal choice and reduced capacity utilisation. For logistics service providers, there is a need for an early detection of demand fluctuations to be able to react adequately to them. Hence, we propose a holistic, network orientated model to pre-plan required transportation capacity and to continuously adjust the intermodal fleet size and composition. Capacity demand on one hand, and capacity supply on the other hand are integrated by a procedure of forecasting, pre-planning and optimising intermodal transport resources. The awareness of demand fluctuations at an earlier stage, gives the opportunity to be able to decide between more alternatives of mode change and capacity adjustment and thus operate more sustainably. It is expected that the model will enable logistics service providers and carriers to organise their transportation networks more economically and ecologically sustainable and in a more flexible way.
The paper gives a structured state-of-the-art-analysis on intermodal transportation planning problems on strategic, tactical and operational planning levels. Problem types are clustered accordingly and their solution approaches are outlined. For each problem type, involved stakeholders, their planning horizons, regarded actions for capacity adjustment and for transportation mode change as well as defined optimisation parameters are described. Additionally, an overview on solution approaches for each problem type is given. State-of-the-art methods do not consider a holistic approach on pre-planning transportation resources in an intermodal transportation network. We conclude with a summary of implications to our research and an outline of our future research.

Publisher

Association for European Transport