Modelling the Effects of Connected Vehicle Platooning: A Micro-simulation Approach



Modelling the Effects of Connected Vehicle Platooning: A Micro-simulation Approach

Authors

Shayan Kavakeb, AECOM, UK, Philip Arnold, AECOM, UK

Description

This paper investigates the impacts of Connected Adaptive Cruise Control on traffic flow and pollutant emissions using the micro-simulation approach on a test case from the literature and a validate simulation model.

Abstract

This paper investigates the impacts of Connected Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) on traffic flow and pollutant emissions. CACC is a new Advanced Driver Assistance System designed to improve traffic flow and safety. CACC involves inter-vehicle communication to regulate the speed and acceleration to reflect that of nearby vehicles. CACC vehicles can therefore safely operate at reduced headways and can hence form linear vehicle formations known as platoons.

A review of current literature suggests this new technology has huge potential for improving traffic flow and enhancing safety and is likely to be widely adopted by automotive industries and traffic authorities in the near future. Thus, it is essential to have the ability to accurately model and predict the influences of CACC before the system has widespread use. To address this, we have conducted research on CACC by developing relevant CACC driving behaviour scripts in C++, using a driver behaviour API, and implementing them within the micro-simulation software Vissim. The developed CACC driving behaviour has been evaluated on a benchmark from the literature and also on a validated realistic simulation model. We have also evaluated the impacts of alternative use of roads such as high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes i.e. dedicated lanes for CACC vehicles. The experimental results from this research reveal four key findings: 1) we have found there is a significant increase in maximum link capacity with capacity being roughly 50% increased at high penetration rates of CCAC vehicles; 2) CACC vehicles have an improved response to shockwaves and can significantly dampen traffic flow disturbances; 3) despite the fact that HOV lanes can improve the performance of CACC vehicles even in low penetration rates, the network performance deteriorates with HOV lanes unless the CACC penetration is very high; and 4) the results indicate that CACC can reduce the CO2 & NOx emissions of vehicles travelling in platoons due to smoother driving behaviour. This paper also explains our newly developed tool to calculate and visualise emissions based on micro-simulation outputs.

Publisher

Association for European Transport