New and Emerging Data Sources to Address Urban Freight Challenges



New and Emerging Data Sources to Address Urban Freight Challenges

Authors

Johanna Zmud, Texas A&M Transportation Institute

Description

This paper/presentation reports on findings of a U.S. Transportation Research Board study that focuses on new sources, analysis, and uses of freight data to address urban freight challenges.

Abstract

This paper/presentation reports on findings of a U.S. Transportation Research Board study that focuses on new sources, analysis, and uses of freight data to address urban freight challenges. Key challenges were identified as downtown deliveries, congestion, parking, and last mile access. Three themes emerged in a synthesis of literature. First, transportation agencies in the U.S. continue to rely on traditional sources of data for managing day-to-day urban and metropolitan network operations, including freight operations. Second, many of the newer sources of data are based on location-enabled or mobile wireless-based technology devices. Third, the future appears to be the integration of data from many different sources and the application of advanced data analytics to create a more holistic picture of a desired environment. Ultimately, the value of data through fusion / integration is if it can be realistically applied. Within this context, several case studies were undertaken to examine the viable application of emerging data sources. This paper/presentation discusses five: Internet of Postal Things, Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I), Analytics applied to tracking and probe data to produce Measures of Urban Freight Fluidity, Data and Optimization for Downtown Deliveries, and Dynamic Intersection Management through Big Data/Machine Learning.

This paper/presentation reports on findings of a U.S. Transportation Research Board study that focuses on new sources, analysis, and uses of freight data to address urban freight challenges. Key challenges were identified as downtown deliveries, congestion, parking, and last mile access. Three themes emerged in a synthesis of literature. First, transportation agencies in the U.S. continue to rely on traditional sources of data for managing day-to-day urban and metropolitan network operations, including freight operations. Second, many of the newer sources of data are based on location-enabled or mobile wireless-based technology devices. Third, the future appears to be the integration of data from many different sources and the application of advanced data analytics to create a more holistic picture of a desired environment. Ultimately, the value of data through fusion / integration is if it can be realistically applied. Within this context, several case studies were undertaken to examine the viable application of emerging data sources. This paper/presentation discusses five: Internet of Postal Things, Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I), Analytics applied to tracking and probe data to produce Measures of Urban Freight Fluidity, Data and Optimization for Downtown Deliveries, and Dynamic Intersection Management through Big Data/Machine Learning.

This paper/presentation reports on findings of a U.S. Transportation Research Board study that focuses on new sources, analysis, and uses of freight data to address urban freight challenges. Key challenges were identified as downtown deliveries, congestion, parking, and last mile access. Three themes emerged in a synthesis of literature. First, transportation agencies in the U.S. continue to rely on traditional sources of data for managing day-to-day urban and metropolitan network operations, including freight operations. Second, many of the newer sources of data are based on location-enabled or mobile wireless-based technology devices. Third, the future appears to be the integration of data from many different sources and the application of advanced data analytics to create a more holistic picture of a desired environment. Ultimately, the value of data through fusion / integration is if it can be realistically applied. Within this context, several case studies were undertaken to examine the viable application of emerging data sources. This paper/presentation discusses five: Internet of Postal Things, Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I), Analytics applied to tracking and probe data to produce Measures of Urban Freight Fluidity, Data and Optimization for Downtown Deliveries, and Dynamic Intersection Management through Big Data/Machine Learning.

Publisher

Association for European Transport