Evaluation of Concessionary Bus Travel: The Impact of the Free Bus Pass



Evaluation of Concessionary Bus Travel: The Impact of the Free Bus Pass

Authors

Lyu Georgiev, Department for Transport, Madeleine Richardson, Department for Transport

Description

This report is an ex-post evaluation, examining statistical and academic evidence about the use and impacts of concessionary travel, and providing an economic appraisal of the policy’s costs and benefits.

Abstract

The English National Travel Concession Scheme (ENCTS), introduced in April 2008, allows free off peak bus travel for residents of England of pensionable age and for disabled people. This report is an ex-post evaluation, examining statistical and academic evidence about the use and impacts of concessionary travel, and providing an economic appraisal of the policy’s costs and benefits. Analysis does not look at the disabled persons’ concession due to a lack of data. Evaluation finds that the pass has had a healthy take-up, particularly amongst people with few transport alternatives and low income. Estimated fare savings are substantial, representing a direct transfer to pass holders. Ex-post value for money analysis estimates costs to government, welfare implications from fare savings for passengers, and external impacts on congestion and environmental damage. This analysis shows that the scheme has been a relative success.

The English National Travel Concession Scheme (ENCTS), introduced in April 2008, allows free off peak bus travel for residents of England of pensionable age and for disabled people. This report is an ex-post evaluation, examining statistical and academic evidence about the use and impacts of concessionary travel, and providing an economic appraisal of the policy’s costs and benefits. Analysis does not look at the disabled persons’ concession due to a lack of data. Evaluation finds that the pass has had a healthy take-up, particularly amongst people with few transport alternatives and low income. Estimated fare savings are substantial, representing a direct transfer to pass holders. Ex-post value for money analysis estimates costs to government, welfare implications from fare savings for passengers, and external impacts on congestion and environmental damage. This analysis shows that the scheme has been a relative success.

Publisher

Association for European Transport