Trying to Catch the Train: Railway Restrucakring in Hungary (1989-1996)



Trying to Catch the Train: Railway Restrucakring in Hungary (1989-1996)

Authors

POLGAR L, Ministry of Transport, Communication and Water Management, Hungary

Description

During the last few years, Hungarian State Railways (MAV) was put several times in the centre of interest in Hungary. Newspapers informed the public about frequent strikes, plans to close light density lines (LDLs) or told them success stories about restr

Abstract

During the last few years, Hungarian State Railways (MAV) was put several times in the centre of interest in Hungary. Newspapers informed the public about frequent strikes, plans to close light density lines (LDLs) or told them success stories about restructuring measures "in line with European guidelines". According to available information, sirb.ilar issues are on the agenda in other Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries willing to join the European Union in the near future. The task for CEE railways facing a dramatic decline of traffic, low productivity and continued capital underfimding is complicated by the lack of set recipes for successfifl railway restructuring as Western European (WE) railways themselves are trying to find lung-term solutions of their financial problems despite a much higher teclmical level and more developed marketing skills. Railway restructuring efforts in Hungary (a country which was in the vanguard of reform in former centrally planned economies in the 1980s and is considered a strong candidate to achieve Union membership among the first CEE countries) show what questions must be answered and what pitfalls should be avoided if potential newcomers want their railways to become an efficient integral part of the European transportation network.

Publisher

Association for European Transport