Monitoring the Effects of Transport Policy Measures: Experiences from the Supertram Monitoring Study



Monitoring the Effects of Transport Policy Measures: Experiences from the Supertram Monitoring Study

Authors

PARKIN J ,MERRALL A, Atkins Wootton Jeffreys, GOODWIN P and PARKHURST G, University College London, UK

Description

Plans for a light rail system serving the City of Sheffield were developed by the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (SYPTE) to enhance the quality of public transport and aid economic regeneration. The system, known as "Supertram", comprises a

Abstract

Plans for a light rail system serving the City of Sheffield were developed by the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (SYPTE) to enhance the quality of public transport and aid economic regeneration. The system, known as "Supertram", comprises almost 30 kilometres of track arranged as two lines meeting in the City Centre and was opened in phases between March 1994 and October 1995. The network arrangement in relation to Sheffield is shown in Figure 1.

In order to investigate the demand and decongestion effects of Supertram, SYPTE and the Secretary of State for Transport commissioned Wootton Jeffreys Consultants (now owned by WS Atldns plc), with assistance from the Economic & Social Research Council's Transport Studies Unit (now based at University College London) to assess the degree to which actual patronage and car transfer correspond to the predictions made in the original analysis, prior to Supertram's construction. In parallel with this work, Sheffield Hallam University were commissioned to investigate Supertram's effect upon employment and urban-regeneration in Sheffield.

The resulting monitoring study has investigated the reasons for differences between the forecast and out-turn eff~ts of Supertram and additionally is in the process of producing some recommendations to improve future evaluations.

A wide variety of types of travel survey were employed both before the implementation of Supertram, in 1993, and after the network's completion, in 1995. The data collected include those from highway specific surveys, public transport passenger surveys and household interviews and comprise both quantitative and qualitative data, as detailed in the following section. The 'before' and 'after' survey data were complemented by continuous monitoring data from a variety of sources, including automatic traffic counts and concessionary fare data surveys.

All movement data were processed with respect to a city-wide zoning system which distinguishes between those areas deemed to be "within scope" or "out of scope" of a Supertram stop. The zoning system is shown in Figure 2.

The Final Report has not yet been agreed with the Department of Transport such that the key study conclusions are unavailable for inclusion in this paper. Instead, the following sections detail some of the more interesting survey findings and focus particularly on the results from qualitative interviews and travel diary surveys which have provided a large database of behavioural data.

Publisher

Association for European Transport