Fundamental Ingredients in the Success of Pilot Projects



Fundamental Ingredients in the Success of Pilot Projects

Authors

PEARMAN A D, SANSOM T, GRANERO-GOMEZ P, University of Leeds and LEWIS A, Transport and Travel Research, UK

Description

This paper presents the findings of an extensive review of experience relating to pilot and demonstration projects in the transport sector. The review raises fundamental issues about the way in which pilot and demonstration projects are conducted, and thi

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of an extensive review of experience relating to pilot and demonstration projects in the transport sector. The review raises fundamental issues about the way in which pilot and demonstration projects are conducted, and this synopsis seeks to draw conclusions which will enhance the value added that can be gained from innovative transport initiatives.

The review reported here was conducted as part of the MAESTRO project. MAESTRO is a project funded by the European Commission's Transport Directorate (DGVII) under the Fourth Framework Programme. The project is coordinated by Transport and Travel Research Ltd, UK. It seeks to establish a common framework and methodology for the selection, design and evaluation of pilot and demonstration projects within the specific research programme on transport. One of the key MAESTRO outputs will be a set of guidelines which seek to assist those involved in pilot and demonstration projects.

The University of Leeds led the review, with contributions from ARISE (Belgium), BPV (Germany), IABG (Germany), NEI (Netherlands), TTR and VTT (Finland). The focus of this paper is on the way in which evaluation in its many forms is carried out, and on the form of evaluation management that goes on throughout the course of the pilot or demonstration project and which seeks to maximise the output from the initiative.

In seeking to draw out fundamental ingredients in the success of pilot projects, a structured approach was adopted to the interrogation of existing experience. Since an explanation of the method used assists in understanding the findings presented here, this approach is summarised in Section 2.

Sections 3, 4 and 5 report the key findings of the review and highlight strengths and weaknesses in various aspects of pilot project planning. Section 3 identifies issues which are specific to individual stages in the development of a project. Section 4 seeks to provide guidance on what constitutes good practice in the management of the evaluation process. Section 5, in examining factors affecting the transferability of project results, identifies issues which enable assessment of the wider applicability of pilot project results.

In Section 6, some lessons are drawn as to the form that guidelines to pilot and demonstration projects should take, if they are to be helpful in assisting the conduct of transport projects.

Note that since the terms pilot and demonstration are not mutually exclusive, the following text adopts the term pilot as a description of any initiative which seeks to test a new approach to the improvement of transport conditions under real life conditions.

Publisher

Association for European Transport