TEN Investment - Ensuring Delivery: Lithuania Case Study



TEN Investment - Ensuring Delivery: Lithuania Case Study

Authors

HUMPHREYS E M, HALL P and BIRCH I, Ove Arup and Partners, UK

Description

The EU has designated principal transport routes within its boundaries covering road, rail and airports. These were defined as the Trans European Network; 14 priority routes were designated in 1994. The rationale for the development of the TEN corridors i

Abstract

The EU has designated principal transport routes within its boundaries covering road, rail and airports. These were defined as the Trans European Network; 14 priority routes were designated in 1994. The rationale for the development of the TEN corridors is to contribute to the integration of the European continent based on the following main themes:

* to ensure sustainable mobility of persons and goods;

* to eliminate bottlenecks and missing links;

* to harmonise technical standards;

* gradual achievement ofinteroperability;

* to promote high quality transport;

* to encourage consideration of all transport modes.

A three layered approach to TENs development has been adopted: a long term plan to implement international agreements on transport mode development such as the AGTC agreement; projects for the medium term and projects for implementation within about five years.

The second Pan-European Transport Conference was held in Crete in 1994 at which a series of additional road and rail corridors were defined for eastern Europe most connecting with the TENs. The original nine corridors were increased to ten following the Helsinki Conference with the addition of Salzburg- Thessaloniki. These corridors were subsequently included in the TEN network.

The aim of the EU is to focus investment on these corridors and to complete the upgrading of their infrastructure by 2015 financed from a range of sources with significant aid through the EU's PHARE and TACIS programmes. Because there are insufficient resources to develop all the TENS in the forseeable future the EU instigated the Transport Needs Infrastructure Assessment (TINA). The TINA process was launched in May 1995 to assess infrastructure needs and to define the aiigmnent ofTEN corridors in the future enlarged Union.

It has proved hard to justify investment and it is apparent that most TEN projects are not attractive for DBFO. Therefore, implementation is a key problem. The TINA process is intended to identify projects of common interest and priorities together their assessment and possible funding. The TINA group is to report in 1998 to the Network Committee created under decision 1692/96/CE.

Publisher

Association for European Transport