Thurrock – London’s Gateway: Transportation Infrastructure Led Growth



Thurrock – London’s Gateway: Transportation Infrastructure Led Growth

Authors

David Bull, Thurrock Council, Andy Millard, Thurrock Council

Description

This paper will look at the key, good practice factors, of integrated land use and transportation that has led to the construction of Europe’s biggest inward investment project - London Gateway Port.

Abstract

This paper will look at the key, good practice factors, of integrated land use and transportation that has led to the construction of Europe’s biggest inward investment project - London Gateway Port. Also reviewed will be the planning processes and highway’s impact of the adjoining 900,000 sq.m logistics park – the largest in Europe. This catalyst for investment has been at the centre to ambitious plans for development to create 18500 new homes and 26,000 new jobs in the local authority area.

London Gateway is the UK’s most significant port development in more than 20 years. The major deep-sea container port occupies over a 600ha site in east Thurrock on the River Thames with a 2.7km long wharf with six berths which can accommodate the largest, 400m long, container ships in operation. The port will handle more than 3.5 million cargo units a year, resulting over an extra 20,000 HGV movements a day on the local strategic highway network. Under construction is a new rail freight link to the national network.12,000 new jobs will be created at and in the vicinity of the Port.

The paper will highlight the partnership working between Thurrock Council, developers DP World and the Government through the Department of Transport, Highways Agency and Department of Communities and Local Government. Britain’s biggest Local Development Order is being considered to progress development, as are proposals to deal with the significant impact on key highway routes such as the A13, J30 on the M25 and the rail network.

The paper will outline the forward planning required and the transportation infrastructure needed to lead Thurrock’s Growth Agenda with new schemes identified along the 27km of the River Thames waterfront. This includes expansion of the 125 year old Port of Tilbury, Grays Town Centre, Lakeside Shopping Centre and retail park, which is the largest agglomeration of retail floorspace in Europe, and the Purfleet Centre with planning permission for 58 ha of development, including 3000 homes, around a revamped railway station.

The paper will link together the reality of commercial viability with good planning, transportation led infrastructure growth and political interventions.

Publisher

Association for European Transport