Sustainable Transport Planning for a Large Housing Development



Sustainable Transport Planning for a Large Housing Development

Authors

BOREHAM A, Boreham Consulting Engineers, UK

Description

This is a case study which focuses on a sustainable transport solution for a proposed large housing development and the philosophy of dealing with the remaining vehicular traffic generation. The planning of development in the United Kingdom involves a num

Abstract

This is a case study which focuses on a sustainable transport solution for a proposed large housing development and the philosophy of dealing with the remaining vehicular traffic generation. The planning of development in the United Kingdom involves a number of stages and many players and I therefore start with a brief explanation of the planning process and whereabouts in it this case study features.

The controlling bodies are the National Government which produces Planning Law and Policy Guidance, County Councils which produce broad brush policies for particular areas and District Councils that produce policies and site specific allocations for particular land uses. The latter also decides planning applications in most instances. It is the District Councils that prepare a Local Plan for their area and the preparation of the Local Plan is the context of this case study.

The Local Plan process is one of preparation, consultation and review and this cycle is repeated a number of times before the plan is finally adopted and used to control development. Initially, a Consultation Draft of the Plan is prepared and comments are invited on it. Those who usually contribute comments include the following:-

The County Council as highway authority

The County Council as planning authority

The Highways Agency

Other statutory consultees

Local organisations

Residents

Landowners

Developers

The District Council preparing the Plan considers the representations and revises its Plan and republishes it as a Deposit Draft Plan which is again subject to consultation. Objections to the Plan (and there are usually many objections) are then considered at a public local inquiry which can last many months. The Inspector conducting the inquiry produces a report and the Council, if it wishes, can publish modifications which are again subject to consultation and after reviewing these it adopts its Plan. Within a short time it will start to review the adopted Plan and the whole process starts all over again.

In this case study I am considering a site which has been included in the Deposit Draft Local Plan of Charnwood Borough Council whose area lies immediately to the north of Leicester and is centred on the town of Lunghborough. I examine the transport policies on which the allocation of the site is based and I describe the transport problems in the area and the solutions which I propose for the development. The County Council's objection and its examination at the Local Plan punic inquiry then lead on to a dilemma which currently faces decision makers and as a result of considering this dilemma I recommend a new approach for dealing with the traffic consequences of development where public transport initiatives are being pursued.

Publisher

Association for European Transport