Commuter Plan The Maas: the First Ten Years



Commuter Plan The Maas: the First Ten Years

WINNER OF The Neil Mansfield Award

Authors

HEMMEN E, Ministry of Transport (AVV), The Netherlands

Description

One of the first activities carried out in the field of Mobility Management by the Netherlands Ministry of Transport was developing a commuter plan for the Maas building - the building the ministry occupies in the centre of P~otterdam. The aim was to coun

Abstract

One of the first activities carried out in the field of Mobility Management by the Netherlands Ministry of Transport was developing a commuter plan for the Maas building - the building the ministry occupies in the centre of P~otterdam. The aim was to counter the negative effects on mobility caused by relocating two branches of the ministry to the new building. Previously, these had been spread out across the province at five different sites. A few years after the move, a new Commuter Pla n de Maas was introduced. Seeing that it is now ten years ago that these first steps were taken, it is probably time for evaluation.

In this paper we will look at the various aspects of the plan - the actual contents of both plans, the results in terms of reduced car ldlometres or fewer Single Occupied Vehicles (SOVs), the instruments that were used, the reactions of new employees, parking policy and the role of management. It was interesting is to see how, within a period of only five years, the context of the commuter plan could evolve so dramatically - so much so, in fact, that the plan had to be adjusted and loose one of its 'show-pieces'. Another prominent feature of the plan was the need to put together one plan that would work for two organisations with different cultures.

We will also be looking at the role that 'model'-commuter plans can play in stimulating Mobility Management at local, regional and national level and at the role of the transport co- ordinator. When countries begin to set up mobility management, a transport co-ordinator at a government agency (such as the Ministry of Transport) can, in addition to his or her normal work within the agency organisation, also advise less experienced co-ordinators at other organisations. This helps take away much of the fear of the unknown when setting up a transport plan.

Publisher

Association for European Transport