Winnipeg's Graham Avenue Transit Mall



Winnipeg's Graham Avenue Transit Mall

Authors

MENZIES W, Winnipeg Transit System, Canada

Description

Situated at the strategic confluence of the Red and Assiuiboine Rivers at the approximate geographical centre of North America (see Figure 1), Winnipeg initially developed as the Red River Settlement, the fur trade centre of the Canadian northwest. After

Abstract

Situated at the strategic confluence of the Red and Assiuiboine Rivers at the approximate geographical centre of North America (see Figure 1), Winnipeg initially developed as the Red River Settlement, the fur trade centre of the Canadian northwest. After completion of the transcontinental Canadian Pacific Railway in the 1880's, large numbers of irnmlgrants began to settle the rich agricuitural lands of the Canadian prairies. During the next three decades, Winnipeg grew very rapidly as a transportation and distribution gateway to western Canada and established itself as the centre of the Canadian grain trade. Since then, the city has grown at more moderate rates and its economy has diversified to include agriculture, aerospace, transportation services, telecommuuieations, health technology and research, information technology, insurance and finance, food processing, secondary manufacturing, bus building, and government services as major industries.

Winnipeg's boundaries comprise a region of 462 km 2. About 95% of its current population of 650,000 residents live within a built up area of 312 km 2. Only 20,000 (or 3%) of the population lives within the central business district. However, about 65,000 (or 24%) of the city's total employment is located in the city's downtown.

Two rivers and two transcontinental railway lines dominate Winnipeg's geography. Major arterial streets radiate from the city centre parallel to the rivers and rail lines. A circumferential roadway rings the city at the periphery. An inner ring road is gradually being built equidistant between the city's eenlre and perimeter. As a matter of policy, no freeways have been built as part of the urban transportation system. Within the urban area, speed limits on arterial streets are low (typically 60 kph) and the number of grade separated intersections is limited.

Public transport services in Winnipeg are planned, managed, and operated by Winnipeg Transit, a depaxtment of the local government. A fleet of 530 buses is used to provide service on 67 routes between 6:00 am and 2:00 am on weekdays and Saturdays and between 7:00 am and 1:00 am on Sundays and Holidays. Indicators for Winnipeg Transit for the 1997 calendar year are summarized in Tables 1 and 2.

Publisher

Association for European Transport