Transit Benefits from Advanced Transportation Management Centres 45



Transit Benefits from Advanced Transportation Management Centres 45

Authors

TURNBULL K, Texas Transportation Institute, USA

Description

Advanced transportation management systems (ATMS) are in operation in many metropolitan areas throughout the United States. The intent of ATMS is to maximize the productivity and efficiency of the surface transportation system through better management of

Abstract

Advanced transportation management systems (ATMS) are in operation in many metropolitan areas throughout the United States. The intent of ATMS is to maximize the productivity and efficiency of the surface transportation system through better management of the existing infrastructure and to enhance safety, mobility, accessibility, and the environment. A variety of approaches are being used to plan, design, finance, implement, and operate ATMS. In many cases, state departments of transportation have the overall responsibility for these systems. Public transit agencies, local jurisdictions, and other groups are often involved in these efforts and may be co-sponsors or the lead agency in some cases.

The first systems implemented in the 1960s and 1970s focused primarily on monitoring and managing traffic conditions on freeways in major urban areas. Over the years, existing and newly developed transportation management systems have become much more complex and sophisticated. First, ITS and other advanced technologies are being used to expand the monitoring, detection, and response capabilities of these systems. Second, some systems encompass not only freeways, but also entrance ramps and adjacent roadways. Third, the inclusion of other modes- such as transit and emergency services - is occurring.

This paper examines the integration of public transit with ATMS. The benefits that can be realized by transit operators, other agencies, and travelers through this integration are described. To accomplish this objective, the paper is divided into six sections following this introduction. An overview of the national experience with transit integration with ATMS is presented first. A case study based on the experience with TranStar, the Greater Houston Transportation Management and Emergency Management Center, is described next. The benefits transit operators can realize through enhanced integration are discussed, followed by an overview of the information transit personnel and vehicles can provide to ATMS. Manual and automated methods of communicating this information are then described. The paper concludes with a discussion of areas for further examination.

This paper is based on research conducted as part of the Texas A&M ITS Research Center of Excellence. The project was funded by the Federa! Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Metropolitan Transit Authority ofHanis County (METRO). The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) and the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) also co-sponsored related research.

The research presented in the paper is based on a number of activities. A state-of-the-art literature review, telephone calls, and electronic mail (email) were used to identify the national experience related to transit integration with ATMS. Second, a two-day workshop was held in Houston with representatives from transit agencies, state departments of transportation, consulting firms, university research institutes, and other groups to discuss the methods and techniques to enhance the coordination between transit and ATMS. Third, the Houston case study is based on interviews with METRO operations personnel, TxDOT staff, and TranStar representatives.

Publisher

Association for European Transport