Integrating Transport Modes on Urban Roads: Implementing Quality Bus Corridors and Cycle Routes in Dublin



Integrating Transport Modes on Urban Roads: Implementing Quality Bus Corridors and Cycle Routes in Dublin

Authors

AUGER M, W S Atkins, UK,

Description

Quality Bus Corridors (QBC) and cycle routes are being developed along ten radial and one circumferential route as part of the Dublin Transport Initiative. The scheme is funded by the Dublin Transportation Office through the European Union Operation Progr

Abstract

Quality Bus Corridors (QBC) and cycle routes are being developed along ten radial and one circumferential route as part of the Dublin Transport Initiative. The scheme is funded by the Dublin Transportation Office through the European Union Operation Programme.

WS Atkins has been involved in the design for the first two QBC and cycle routes along the Malahide Road and Blanchardstown corridors in Dublin, for Dublin CorporationÕs Environmental Transport Planning Division and Dublin Bus Company. Dutch cycle facility specialists Grontmij Consulting Engineers contributed to the projects as sub-consultants. The Malahide Road corridor is 10 kilometres long, and the Blanchardstown corridor is 16 kilometres long. The routes are shown in Figure 1.1.

These corridors contain some of the busiest roads in Dublin. The characteristics of the roads vary from high speed dual carriageways, to village centres and narrow city centre streets. To achieve safe and comfortable facilities for cyclists and significant priority for buses represents a considerable challenge. The Malahide Road corridor, the first corridor to be designed, is seen as a flagship project by Dublin Corporation, and will be used as a test bed for innovative design features which could be implemented on other corridors in Dublin. Construction began on both corridors in Autumn 1997.

The projects have a broad scope beyond just improvements for bus users and cyclists. The paper will describe the design decisions and compromises necessary to cater for the following objectives. A typical compromise to be discussed is between the need to provide adequate parking in busy shopping streets, and the need for a bus or cycle lane.

Publisher

Association for European Transport