TEN-T Implementation: Assessment of the Repercussions at National and Regional Levels



TEN-T Implementation: Assessment of the Repercussions at National and Regional Levels

Authors

HEDDEBAUT O, INRETS TRACES, France

Description

Since the parution of the White Paper in 1993 on growth, competitiveness and employment, a list of 26 priority transport projects has been set up (E.C., 1993). This list has been shortened to 11 during the European council of Corfou and fixed to 14 projec

Abstract

Since the parution of the White Paper in 1993 on growth, competitiveness and employment, a list of 26 priority transport projects has been set up (E.C., 1993). This list has been shortened to 11 during the European council of Corfou and fixed to 14 projects in Essen one in December. Furthermore, the necessity of economic convergence limits the possibilities of using public funds for the implementation of all those projects. This could cancel some fimdings and thus priorities of some projects (Heddebaut, Joignaux, 1995). Where are we in 1999 ? The High level group on Public Private Partnership for the realisation of TEN'S confirms the fimding difficulties of the missing keys of the network (Kinnock, 1997). We show the evolution of T-TEN '¬°Essen" priorities associated with their fimdhig, and the state of progress of these projects (part I).

Taking into acount the Charmel tunnel and the T.G.V. North experiences, we examine what could be the regional consequencies like overall construction effects of making such links. We particularly put forwards the necessity to realise transport investments on secondary networks linked with the large scale infrastructure as one of the changes introduced in the Transport Policy (E. C., 1999), impulsed by the European Parliament which is now more and more involved in decisions related to TEN-T realisation (E. C. Guidelines, 1998).

We will focus on the amount of public funds involved because of the Channel manel realisation through an ex-post assessment of the back up strategy which recommended the construction of complementary transport infrastructures. We analyse the TGV high speed rail system reurganisation and its role at regional level highlighted with the evolutive legislative context in France and in Europe which preconises the setting up of a unique intermodal service transport scheme. Then we examine the regional commitment at each end of the link towards a new cross-border developpement ladder called the Euroregion. (part II).

Publisher

Association for European Transport