Large Scale Demand Responsive Transit Systems - a Local Suburban Transport Solution for the Next Millennium?



Large Scale Demand Responsive Transit Systems - a Local Suburban Transport Solution for the Next Millennium?

Authors

BAKKER P, The Netherlands Ministry (AVV), The Netherlands

Description

In many western countries, 'suburbanity' is an expanding phenomenon. This is not expected to change in the future, as consumers highly prefer such low-density dwelling locations. In low-density areas, it is getting more and more complex to provide local p

Abstract

In many western countries, 'suburbanity' is an expanding phenomenon. This is not expected to change in the future, as consumers highly prefer such low-density dwelling locations. In low-density areas, it is getting more and more complex to provide local public transport in the classical way: time-tabled fixed route services show rising deficits and are insufficiently competitive with individual car use.

Recently in the Netherlands, a study was carried out examining three options for transport systems in suburban settings. The shared-taxi system was demonstrated to be well placed for success. Due to legislation in favour of persons with disabilities, 95 shared taxi services in the Netherlands nowadays are active in 322 municipalities. Characteristics are: demand responsive, door-to-door service, request by telephone only one hour in advance. Some services operate hundreds of thousands trips a year. Some of these services are also open for other user groups besides disabled people. This development is supported by legislation that makes it possible to use regular public transport funds and enables experiments with user subsidies. Effects of these measures are the subject of rescarch.

This paper will report the experiences of these large scale demand responsive taxi systems, like product characteristics, costs per passenger-trip, level ofnse and bottlenecks. It is not based on the results of one particular research project, but it brings together the results of several projects and studies in the Netherlands and personal eonsultaney experience in paratrartsit. Besides these experiences, the paper will also consider research to be carried out in the near future.

Finally, it will discuss whether application of new technology can help to overcome existing bottlenecks and whether opening to the general public of still restricted dial-a-fide systems might provide a local suburban public transport solution for the next millennium which is competing with the car.

Publisher

Association for European Transport