The Norwegian Trial Scheme for Public Transport: the Conclusions 500 Experiments Later



The Norwegian Trial Scheme for Public Transport: the Conclusions 500 Experiments Later

Authors

STANGELY I, RENOLEN H and KJORSTAD K, Institute of Transport Economies, Norway

Description

In 1990, the Parliament agreed to the proposal from the Government to strengthen public transport by experiments and attempts. In 1991 to 1995 - 438 million NOK was granted to 511 locally developed experiments of different characters. One half to one quar

Abstract

In 1990, the Parliament agreed to the proposal from the Government to strengthen public transport by experiments and attempts. In 1991 to 1995 - 438 million NOK was granted to 511 locally developed experiments of different characters. One half to one quarter of the amount was transferred when the local administration or transport operator had accepted the terms of the Ministry of Transport and Communications. The remaining was transferred as soon as the Ministry received the demanded local reports from the experiments, based on a standard evaluation plan.

In 1993, the initiative and evaluation plan from the trial scheme was presented at the PTRC- conference. This paper presents the final conclusions from the trial scheme based on the overall evaluation from the different experiments. One interesting result from the experiments is that a continuously declining passenger trend in Norway after 1991 has turned to a slight increase in the mtmber of passengers, for some cities up to 30-40 percent. Other interesting examples is the low price "Household pass" and high price "High standard bus", both services targeted for special user groups.

The paper will concentrate on the following questions and focuses on the general conclusions from the evaluation and present some of the "best practises".

1. To what extent did the measures lead travellers to switch from car, walking or cycling to public transport, and to what extent did those measures generate new traffic?

2. To what extent did the same type of measure produce different effects depending on the local conditions?

3. To what extent did the marketing campaigns reach the public? How well did the various channels function?

4. Which responses were registered to measures targeted on various groups of passengers, such as discounted season tickets for young people or rush-hour express buses?

Publisher

Association for European Transport