Comparative Evaluation Ofgreenways and Bus Priority Lanes



Comparative Evaluation Ofgreenways and Bus Priority Lanes

Authors

SEAMAN D, The Scottish Office and HEGGIE N, Colin Buchanan and Partners, UK

Description

As an element of the Edinburgh local authority transport strategy, Moving Forward, an enhanced bus priority scheme, Greenways, has been implemented. Four arterial routes emanating from the city centre have been treated with extensive, two-way bus priority

Abstract

As an element of the Edinburgh local authority transport strategy, Moving Forward, an enhanced bus priority scheme, Greenways, has been implemented. Four arterial routes emanating from the city centre have been treated with extensive, two-way bus priority measures. Totalling 26kin in length, these routes aim to fulfil targets of the Moving Forward strategy:

* To improve bus reliability on Greenway corridors

* To reduce bus journey times on Greenway corridors

* Halt the increase in car traffic by a third by 2000 and l~y reduce bY 30% bY 2010

* Meet European Guidelines for nitrogen dioxide by 2000

Greenways axe an addition to the traffic management measures which have existed in Edinburgh for a number years. Typically these are "conventional or traditional" bus priority lanes, enforced by Traffic Regulation Order, which prohibit use by general traffic except buses, taxis and cyclists, Edinburgh currently has some 12kin of such lanes. Greenways are an example of combining many discrete traffic management measures and comprehensive on-street public transport information. They are instantly recognisable as a differentiated coloured carriageway surfacing which has quickly become familiar as part of the Edinburgh streetscape. There are eight distinct facets of Greenways which distinguish them from conventional bus priority:

* Strict enforcement

* Traffic calling on side streets

* Cyclist and pedestrian improvements

* Priority given to public transport, pedestrians and cyclists

* Live throughout the working day

* Red lines which prohibit stopping replace yellow lines

* Policing and enforcement by a dedicated warden force

* Improved standard of bus shelters with comprehensive bus information and branding

This research project considers 2 of the 4 Greenway corridors, the A8 (Glasgow Road) and A900 (Leith Walk). This continuous 13 km length runs from the western extremity of the city, through the city centre and south east to Leith, and was opened on 4 August 1997.

In order to provide a comparison corridor upon which Greenways could be assessed a 2.5km length of traditional bus only lane, within the city has also been studied in detail.

"The Bridges" is a 2.5kin corridor from the south east of the city which has been treated with bus lanes since the late 1970s. It is fronted by a mix of large and small retail units, and a diverse range of housing types. In general the bus lanes are restricted to buses, taxis and cyclists only from 8:00am - 9:15am and 4:30pro - 6:00pm.

Publisher

Association for European Transport