Design of Bus Stops As Part of Bus Priorities



Design of Bus Stops As Part of Bus Priorities

Authors

FERNANDEZ R, University of Chile and TYLER N, University College London, UK

Description

Most research on bus stops have been concentrated on the bus progression and the bus reliability problem. The main concern in these approaches have been to maintain the regular headways along a route in order both to adhere to bus schedules and to reduce

Abstract

Most research on bus stops have been concentrated on the bus progression and the bus reliability problem. The main concern in these approaches have been to maintain the regular headways along a route in order both to adhere to bus schedules and to reduce waiting times at stops (Newell and Potts, 1964; Holroyd and Scraggs, 1966). Much analytical work and many simulation models have been developed to address the same problem (e.g. Bly and Jackson, 1974; Powell and Shefi, 1983; Lobo, 1997). These models take into account the whole route performance, .therefore, bus stop operations are necessarily simplified. The simplifications can be assumptions about the arrival patterns of passengers and buses at bus stops, dwell times, number of stops within the stop area, etc. As a result, the bus system has been conceptualised as a sort of rail system (fixed frequencies, no overtaking, etc.). Newell and Potts (1964), for instance, assume constant dwell times, equidistant stops, and that buses cannot overtake in their work to explain the bus pairing. However, variations in stop times, the frequency of stops and the possibility of overtaking at bus stops play a fundamental role in the quality of bus services (Tyler, 1992).

This article discusses the importance of bus stop operations on bus services and for what reason bus stop design should be part of the bus priority schemes. Then, a process for designing bus stops is suggested. Some concluding comments are finally offered.

Publisher

Association for European Transport