Changing Travel Behaviour



Changing Travel Behaviour

Authors

JAMES N and FEREDAY D, Transport and Travel Research, UK

Description

This paper addresses the theme of changing tr~ivel behaviour in discussing the measures, conclusions and recommendations drawn from the European funded OPILrM project, which also reflect the measures and results achieved within the related CAPTURE project

Abstract

This paper addresses the theme of changing tr~ivel behaviour in discussing the measures, conclusions and recommendations drawn from the European funded OPILrM project, which also reflect the measures and results achieved within the related CAPTURE project. The evaluation, results and conclusions of both projects were presented and discussed at the joint OPIUM]CAPTURE conference held in Brussels in January 1999. The projects received very positive feedback from the project managers, interested transport professionals and officials from DGVI] of the European Commission.

These projects are major transport research and development initiatives, which were established and conducted to evaluate the effects of implementing physical transport measures to monitor new transport policy measures in several European cities under a common framework. This framework incorporated a view to shift transport policy- making away from the provision of more road space for the private car towards the management and control of traffic and the promotion of sustainable transport choices.

Following this introduction, the paper focuses on the measures implemented and evaluated within the OPIUM project. The issue of barriers to implementation is discussed, including the impact these may have on the implementation of measures, and the ultimate success of the project. Also discussed are the forms these barriers might take, and how their very nature changes according to the national culture in which they are founded.

A description follows of the barriers to implementation which have so far been uncovered within OPIUM, and the methods used to overcome or circumvent them. It will, thus, be argued that far from being barriers to implementation, such public consultation exercises may be seen as an empowerment exercise for the local communities, which provide valuable feedback and assistance to the local authorities within the planning process.

The paper concludes by drawing some conclusions on the issue of barriers to implementation, and discusses the key question of the transferability of such findings.

Publisher

Association for European Transport